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Spellings

There are relatively few ‘new’ spelling rules to learn in Year 6, but we do need to go over and revise all the rules learnt previously learnt throughout key Stage 2. Every week, we share a spelling rule for you to explore at home. Spellings are usually set at the same time as homework, on a Thursday/Friday. Sometimes this will include an online spelling activity which means as well as some practice you also they get a spelling tests score emailed to you. We expect you to try again if your score is low. Sometimes you will have more than one week to practise if a rule is tricky. You should try to practise learning the spellings on a daily basis. You can learn the spellings using online games here or write them out and do them on paper, whatever works best for you, as long as you learn the rule. You can get more help with spellings from ‘Beating Dyslexia’ which is a great site, for all spellers not just adults and children with dyslexia. 

Scroll to the bottom of the page for a folder which has additional sheets and weekly lists, including the Year 5 / 6 list of DfE spellings.

SPRING TERM SPELLINGS (scroll down for summer)
Spring Week 1 & 2
Homophones - try these to practise and learn more BBC Homophones Game, What are homophones, more info

Spring week 3 & 4:

Endings  spelt –cious or -tious

Not many common words end like this.

If the root word ends in –ce the sound is usually spelt as – e.g.

vicious

grace - gracious

space – spacious

malice – malicious

Exception = anxious

Examples of words you could learn - though it is the RULE you need to know. What other words can you find that fit this rule?

vicious, precious, conscious, delicious, malicious, suspicious, ambitious, cautious, fictitious, infectious, nutritious

Tips & games:

http://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=391


Spring Spellings week 5 & 6

The ending  -cial

-cial is common either after a consonant letter, but there are exceptions:


Exceptions: initial, financial, commercial, provincial (the spelling of the last three is clearly related to finance, commerce and province)

Examples of words you could learn - though it is the RULE you need to know.

What other words can you find that fit this rule?


official, special, artificial, partial, confidential, essential


Tips & games:

http://www.spellzone.com/games/index.cfm?wordlist=389


Spring Week 7 (after half-term)

The ending  -ant  & - ance :

Use –ant, -ance, -ancy if there is a related word with a /ae/ or /e_ɪ/ sound in the right position; -ation endings are often a clue.

There are many words, however, where the above guidelines don’t help. These words just have to be learned.

Examples of words you could learn - though it is the RULE you need to know.

What other words can you find that fit this rule?


observant, observance (observation)

expectant, (expectation)

hesitant, (hesitation)

tolerant, tolerance (toleration)

substance, (substancial)


Spring Week 8

The ending  -ent, -ence

Use –ent and –enceafter soft (/s/ sound), soft and qu or if there is a related word with a clear /ʃ/ sound in the right position.

There are many words, however, where the above guidelines don’t help. These words just have to be learned

Examples of words you could learn - though it is the RULE you need to know.

What other words can you find that fit this rule?


innocent, innocence,

consequent, consequence

absent, absence

convenient, convenience

different, difference


Spring week 9

The ending  -ancy, -ency

Use  -ancy if there is a related word with a /ae/ or /e_ɪ/ sound in the right position; -ation endings are often a clue.Use -ency after soft (/s/ sound), soft and qu or if there is a related word with a clear /ʃ/ sound in the right position.

There are many words, however, where the above guidelines don’t help. These words just have to be learned.

Examples of words you could learn - though it is the RULE you need to know.

What other words can you find that fit this rule?


discrepancy

infancy

redundancy

expectancy


agency

currency

fluency

sufficiency

decency


Spring Week 10 & 11

Words ending in –ible and -ibly The –ible ending is common if a complete root word can’t be heard before it but it also sometimes occurs when a complete word can he heard (e.g. sensible).

  • When a word ends in -ible, it's less likely that the part before the ending will be a recognizable English word. Take permissible or audible, for example: ‘permiss’ and ‘aud’ are not English words.
  • This is only a guideline and there are exceptions to the general principle. For example, accessible and collapsible both end in -ible even though they are formed from the recognizable words access and collapse.
  • Examples of words you could learn - though it is the RULE you need to know.


    What other words can you find that fit this rule?


    Possible/possibly

    horrible/horribly

    terrible/terribly

    visible/visibly


    SUMMER SPELLINGS (After Easter Holidays)


    Summer Weeks 1 & 2
     

    Words ending in –able and -ably

    As with –ant and –ance/-ancy, the able ending is used if there is a related word ending in –ation. If the –able ending is added to a word ending in –ce bor –ge, the e after the or must be kept as those letters would otherwise  have their ‘hard’ sounds (as in cap and gap) before the of the –able ending. The –able ending is usually but not always used if a complete root word can be heard before it, even if there is not related word ending in –ation. The first five examples opposite are obvious; in reliable, the completer word rely is heard, but the changes to in accordance with the rule.

     

    Examples of words you could learn - though it is the RULE you need to know.


    What other words can you find that fit this rule?




    adorable/adorably (adoration)

    applicable/applicably (application)

    considerable/considerably (consideration)


     changeable, noticeable, forcible, legible


    dependable, comfortable, understandable, reasonable, enjoyable, reliable



    Summer Week 3 
     

    Adding suffixes beginning with vowel letters to words ending in –fer


     

    The is not doubled if the –fer is no longer stressed.

     

    Examples of words you could learn - though it is the RULE you need to know.


    What other words can you find that fit this rule?


    referring

    referred

    referral

    preferring

    preferred

    transferring

    transferred

    reference   referee

    preference    transference


    Week 4 
     

    Use of the hyphen


    Hyphens can be used to join a prefix to a root word, especially if the prefix ends in a vowel letter and the root word also begins with one.

     

    Examples of words you could learn - though it is the RULE you need to know.


    What other words can you find that fit this rule?


    co-ordinate

    re-enter

    co-operate

    co-own


    Week 5
     

    Words containing the letter-string ough


     


    This is one of the trickiest spellings in English – it can be used to spell a number of different sounds.

     

    Examples of words you could learn - though it is the RULE you need to know.


    What other words can you find that fit this rule?


    ought, bought, thought, brought, fought

    rough, tough, enough

    though, although, dough

    through

    thorough, borough

    plough, bough


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    Year 6 Spellings